Thursday, November 17, 2011

Did you obtained an immigrant visa as single but actually married?

By Crispin Lozano
 
If you obtained an immigrant visa as single son or daughter of a Lawful Permanent Resident or a U. S. citizen but you are actually married at the time of your entry to the U. S., you committed a misrepresentation of material fact in obtaining a visa because you did not disclose your marital status at the time of the interview and/or at the time you entered the United States.  Even if you are actually single at the time of the interview but you get married the day before entering the U. S. you still committed a misrepresentation. Although you have a document which is your green card, your actual status is that of a person not in possession of a valid visa.  An alien not in possession of a valid visa is inadmissible and deportable.  If you applied for naturalization the USCIS will likely find it out.  Your naturalization application will be denied and you will be sent to an Immigration Judge for removal proceedings.
Question: Mario was petitioned by Jose, his father who is a Lawful Permanent Resident in 1985.  His father became a U.S. citizen in 1993.  Mario got married to Linda in 1988.  Mario and Linda have a child born in 1989 named Cindy. In 1991, Mario was interviewed at the U. S. Embassy, Manila for an immigrant visa.  He declared that he was single and has no child.  Based on this declaration he was given a visa and entered the U. S. in 1992.  Mario married Linda again in 1993 and filed an immigrant visa petition for his wife and daughter.  The petition was denied because the USCIS discovered his prior marriage to Linda in 1988 and he committed a misrepresentation of material fact by not disclosing his marriage to Linda in 1988 and the existence of his daughter.  Mario received a Notice to Appear to the Immigration Court.  What is Mario’s immigration status?
Answer: Mario committed a fraud or misrepresentation of material fact in obtaining a visa at the U.S. Embassy.  By entering the U.S. without disclosing his marriage and children is again a misrepresentation to the U.S. Immigration Officer.  These two acts of misrepresentation made Mario inadmissible and deportable.
Question: What is the relief available to Mario?
Answer: Mario may request the immigration court for a waiver of the misrepresentation. To avail of this waiver Mario must have a parent or son or daughter who is Lawful Permanent Resident or U.S. citizen.
Note: This is not a legal advice.
Immigration News  
1. On November 7, 2011, we received an approval from the Immigration Court for waiver of misrepresentation for a person who entered the U.S. as single but actually married.  The person can now apply with naturalization.

1 comment:

  1. i have really interested about Permanent Resident or a U. S. Permanent Resident or a U. S. citizen. thanks for share this post.


    Employment Pass Singapore | Entrepreneur Pass Singapore

    ReplyDelete